Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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"what, is HE in the country? That is good news however; I will ride over tomorrow, and ask him to dinner on Thursday."
"Know him! to be sure I do. Why, he is down here every year."
"As good a kind of fellow as ever lived, I assure you. A very decent shot, and there is not a bolder rider in England."
"Upon my soul,"
"I do not know much about him as to all THAT. But he is a pleasant, good humoured fellow, and has got the nicest little black bitch of a pointer I ever saw. Was she out with him today?"
"Yes, yes, he is very well worth catching I can tell you, Miss Dashwood; he has a pretty little estate of his own in Somersetshire besides; and if I were you, I would not give him up to my younger sister, in spite of all this tumbling down hills. Miss Marianne must not expect to have all the men to herself. Brandon will be jealous, if she does not take care."
"He is as good a sort of fellow, I believe, as ever lived,"
"I remember last Christmas at a little hop at the park, he danced from eight o'clock till four, without once sitting down."
"Yes; and he was up again at eight to ride to covert."
"Aye, aye, I see how it will be,"
"I see how it will be. You will be setting your cap at him now, and never think of poor Brandon."
"Ay, you will make conquests enough, I dare say, one way or other. Poor Brandon! he is quite smitten already, and he is very well worth setting your cap at, I can tell you, in spite of all this tumbling about and spraining of ankles."
"What is the matter with Brandon?"
"We must go,"
"It shall not be put off when we are so near it. You cannot go to town till tomorrow, Brandon, that is all."
"There is no persuading you to change your mind, Brandon, I know of old,"
"when once you are determined on anything. But, however, I hope you will think better of it. Consider, here are the two Miss Careys come over from Newton, the three Miss Dashwoods walked up from the cottage, and Mr. Willoughby got up two hours before his usual time, on purpose to go to Whitwell."
"Well, then, when will you come back again?"
"Oh! he must and shall come back,"
"If he is not here by the end of the week, I shall go after him."
"I do not want to pry into other men's concerns. I suppose it is something he is ashamed of."
"You do not go to town on horseback, do you?"
"Well, as you are resolved to go, I wish you a good journey. But you had better change your mind."
"You MUST drink tea with us to night,"
"for we shall be quite alone — and tomorrow you must absolutely dine with us, for we shall be a large party."
"I wish with all my soul,"
"that Willoughby were among us again."
"we have brought you some strangers. How do you like them?"
"Never mind if they do. It is only the Palmers. Charlotte is very pretty, I can tell you. You may see her if you look this way."
"Where is Marianne? Has she run away because we are come? I see her instrument is open."
"Here comes Marianne,"
"Now, Palmer, you shall see a monstrous pretty girl."
"I am afraid, Miss Marianne,"
"you have not been able to take your usual walk to Allenham today."
"My dear,"
"it is very provoking that we should be so few. Why did not you ask the Gilberts to come to us today?"
"Do come now,"
"pray come — you must come — I declare you shall come — You can't think how you will like them. Lucy is monstrous pretty, and so good humoured and agreeable! The children are all hanging about her already, as if she was an old acquaintance. And they both long to see you of all things, for they have heard at Exeter that you are the most beautiful creatures in the world; and I have told them it is all very true, and a great deal more. You will be delighted with them I am sure. They have brought the whole coach full of playthings for the children. How can you be so cross as not to come? Why they are your cousins, you know, after a fashion. YOU are my cousins, and they are my wife's, so you must be related."
"His name is Ferrars,"
"but pray do not tell it, for it's a great secret."
"I have a notion,"
"that Miss Marianne would not object to such a scheme, if her elder sister would come into it. It is very hard indeed that she should not have a little pleasure, because Miss Dashwood does not wish it. So I would advise you two, to set off for town, when you are tired of Barton, without saying a word to Miss Dashwood about it."
"A man of whom he had always had such reason to think well! Such a good-natured fellow! He did not believe there was a bolder rider in England! It was an unaccountable business. He wished him at the devil with all his heart. He would not speak another word to him, meet him where he might, for all the world! No, not if it were to be by the side of Barton covert, and they were kept watching for two hours together. Such a scoundrel of a fellow! such a deceitful dog! It was only the last time they met that he had offered him one of Folly's puppies! and this was the end of it!"