Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status


mode of speech

it was a serious charge;—a girl so brought up must be adequately provided for, or there would be cruelty instead of kindness in taking her from her family.
His daughters, he felt, while they retained the name of Bertram, must be giving it new grace, and in quitting it, he trusted, would extend its respectable alliances; and the character of Edmund, his strong good sense and uprightness of mind, bid most fairly for utility, honour, and happiness to himself and all his connexions.
he hoped she might see William again in the course of the ensuing winter, and had charged her to write and invite him to Mansfield as soon as the squadron to which he belonged should be known to be in England.
the marriage should not take place before his return, which he was again looking eagerly forward to.
had strong hopes of settling everything to his entire satisfaction, and leaving Antigua before the end of the summer.
his dear Fanny,
how much she was grown!
he need not inquire, for her appearance spoke sufficiently on that point.
His business in Antigua had latterly been prosperously rapid, and he came directly from Liverpool, having had an opportunity of making his passage thither in a private vessel, instead of waiting for the packet;
his good fortune in finding them all at home— coming unexpectedly as he did— all collected together exactly as he could have wished, but dared not depend on.
he found that he could not be any longer in the house without just looking into his own dear room,
Some one was talking there in a very loud accent; he did not know the voice —more than talking— almost hallooing.
making part of a ridiculous exhibition in the midst of theatrical nonsense,
The reproof of an immediate conclusion of everything, the sweep of every preparation, would be sufficient.
The young people had been very inconsiderate in forming the plan; they ought to have been capable of a better decision themselves; but they were young; and, excepting Edmund, he believed, of unsteady characters; and with greater surprise, therefore, he must regard her acquiescence in their wrong measures, her countenance of their unsafe amusements, than that such measures and such amusements should have been suggested.
where the present pleasure of those she loved was at stake, her kindness did sometimes overpower her judgment.
of his being then at least as far off as Northampton.
another day or two would suffice to wipe away every outward memento of what had been, even to the destruction of every unbound copy of Lovers' Vows in the house,
She could not, did not like him.
Advantageous as would be the alliance, and long standing and public as was the engagement, her happiness must not be sacrificed to it. Mr. Rushworth had, perhaps, been accepted on too short an acquaintance, and, on knowing him better, she was repenting.
to be open and sincere,
assured her that every inconvenience should be braved, and the connexion entirely given up, if she felt herself unhappy in the prospect of it. He would act for her and release her.
Mr. Rushworth was young enough to improve. Mr. Rushworth must and would improve in good society; and if Maria could now speak so securely of her happiness with him, speaking certainly without the prejudice, the blindness of love, she ought to be believed. Her feelings, probably, were not acute; he had never supposed them to be so; but her comforts might not be less on that account; and if she could dispense with seeing her husband a leading, shining character, there would certainly be everything else in her favour. A well-disposed young woman, who did not marry for love, was in general but the more attached to her own family; and the nearness of Sotherton to Mansfield must naturally hold out the greatest temptation, and would, in all probability, be a continual supply of the most amiable and innocent enjoyments.
Mr. Crawford was somewhat distinguishing his niece—
any one in the habit of such idle observations would have thought that Mr. Crawford was the admirer of Fanny Price.
There was no want of respect in the young man's address; and Fanny's reception of it was so proper and modest, so calm and uninviting, that he had nothing to censure in her.
to gratify anybody else who might wish to see Fanny dance, and to give pleasure to the young people in general;
with all necessary allowance for the shortness of the notice, to collect young people enough to form twelve or fourteen couple:
to fix on the 22nd as the most eligible day.
William was required to be at Portsmouth on the 24th; the 22nd would therefore be the last day of his visit; but where the days were so few it would be unwise to fix on any earlier.
His nephew's introduction to Admiral Crawford might be of service. The Admiral,
had interest.
education and manners she owed to him.
join the early breakfast party in that house instead of eating alone: he should himself be of it;
the suspicions whence, he must confess to himself, this very ball had in great measure sprung, were well founded.
Mr. Crawford was in love with Fanny.
advising her to go immediately to bed.
it best for each daughter that the permission should be granted,
if he might come in.
a little relenting, a little change of inclination, might have something to do with it; and to augur favourably from the personal entreaty of the young man himself.
her to be very timid, and exceedingly nervous; and
it not improbable that her mind might be in such a state as a little time, a little pressing, a little patience, and a little impatience, a judicious mixture of all on the lover's side, might work their usual effect on.
If the gentleman would but persevere,
As a general reflection on Fanny,
nothing could be more unjust,
At Mansfield Park Mr. Crawford would always be welcome; he had only to consult his own judgment and feelings as to the frequency of his visits, at present or in future. In all his niece's family and friends, there could be but one opinion, one wish on the subject; the influence of all who loved her must incline one way.
to abstain from all farther importunity with his niece, and to shew no open interference
Upon her disposition