Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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Her eldest was a boy of ten years old, a fine spirited fellow, who longed to be out in the world; but what could she do? Was there any chance of his being hereafter useful to Sir Thomas in the concerns of his West Indian property? No situation would be beneath him; or what did Sir Thomas think of Woolwich? or how could a boy be sent out to the East?
the impossibility of getting Sam ready in time,
the shocking character of all the Portsmouth servants, of whom
her own two were the very worst,
Mr. Price was out, which she regretted very much.
she had never seen so agreeable a man in her life;
so great and so agreeable as he was, he should be come down to Portsmouth neither on a visit to the port-admiral, nor the commissioner, nor yet with the intention of going over to the island, nor of seeing the dockyard.
she could seldom, with her large family, find time for a walk.
to go with them to the Garrison chapel,
her poor sister
but how to find anything to hold Susan's clothes, because Rebecca took away all the boxes and spoilt them,