Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status

class status


mode of speech

remember some of that gentleman's reputed disposition when quite a lad which might agree with it,
was confident at last that she recollected having heard Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy formerly spoken of as a very proud, ill-natured boy.
she was,
Mr. Gardiner would be prevented by business from setting out till a fortnight later in July, and must be in London again within a month, and as that left too short a period for them to go so far, and see so much as they had proposed, or at least to see it with the leisure and comfort they had built on, they were obliged to give up the Lakes, and substitute a more contracted tour, and, according to the present plan, were to go no farther northwards than Derbyshire. In that county there was enough to be seen to occupy the chief of their three weeks;
Pemberley was situated. It was not in their direct road, nor more than a mile or two out of it.
to see the place again.
how she liked it.
only of returning to the carriage as quickly as possible.
nothing, therefore, could be fairly conjectured from that,