Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status

class status


mode of speech

it was what she had expected all the while.
he might be always flying about from one place to another, and never settled at Netherfield as he ought to be.
she would,
her thanks to Mr. Bingley for his kindness to Jane,
for troubling him also with Lizzy.
they could not possibly have the carriage before Tuesday;
if Mr. Bingley and his sister pressed them to stay longer, she could spare them very well.
at their coming,
very wrong to give so much trouble,
Jane would have caught cold again.
against the cruelty of settling an estate away from a family of five daughters, in favour of a man whom nobody cared anything about.
they were very well able to keep a good cook,
her daughters had nothing to do in the kitchen.
herself not at all offended;
“As to her younger daughters, she could not take upon her to say — she could not positively answer — but she did not know of any prepossession; her eldest daughter, she must just mention — she felt it incumbent on her to hint, was likely to be very soon engaged.”
the probability of their marriage was extremely agreeable to her.
His being such a charming young man, and so rich, and living but three miles from them,
then it was such a comfort to think how fond the two sisters were of Jane, and to be certain that they must desire the connection as much as she could do. It was, moreover, such a promising thing for her younger daughters, as Jane's marrying so greatly must throw them in the way of other rich men; and lastly, it was so pleasant at her time of life to be able to consign her single daughters to the care of their sister, that she might not be obliged to go into company more than she liked.
Lady Lucas might soon be equally fortunate,
having spoken so sensibly,
he was a remarkably clever, good kind of young man.
of seeing the whole family soon at Longbourn,
how happy he would make them by eating a family dinner with them at any time, without the ceremony of a formal invitation.
on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.
to persuade her friend Lizzy to comply with the wishes of all her family.
the ladies should happen to go away just as they were all getting so intimate together.
Mr. Bingley would be soon down again and soon dining at Longbourn,
though he had been invited only to a family dinner, she would take care to have two full courses.
how happy they should be to see him at Longbourn again, whenever his other engagements might allow him to visit them.
he must be entirely mistaken;
In the first place,
disbelieving the whole of the matter; secondly, she was very sure that Mr. Collins had been taken in; thirdly, she trusted that they would never be happy together; and fourthly, that the match might be broken off.
Elizabeth was the real cause of all the mischief;
she herself had been barbarously misused by them all;
It was very strange that he should come to Longbourn instead of to Lucas Lodge; it was also very inconvenient and exceedingly troublesome. She hated having visitors in the house while her health was so indifferent, and lovers were of all people the most disagreeable.
if he did not come back she would think herself very ill used.
they were talking of the Longbourn estate, and resolving to turn herself and her daughters out of the house, as soon as Mr. Bennet were dead.
Mr. Bingley must be down again in the summer.
They had all been very ill-used since she last saw her sister. Two of her girls had been upon the point of marriage, and after all there was nothing in it.
she had herself endured on a similar occasion, five-and-twenty years ago.
Lydia's going to Brighton
her husband's never intending to go there himself.
for the felicity of her daughter,
she should not miss the opportunity of enjoying herself as much as possible —
as the only security for her husband's not being killed in a duel.
her daughter would be married was enough.
to all the particulars of calico, muslin, and cambric,
some very plentiful orders,
besides, it was such a pity that Lydia should be taken from a regiment where she was acquainted with everybody, and had so many favourites.
how absolutely necessary such an attention would be from all the neighbouring gentlemen, on his returning to Netherfield.