Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status


mode of speech

Perry to be upon the watch,
and as he went about so much, something,
might come from that quarter.
at its not being taken every evening by every body,
its wholesomeness for every constitution,
the many houses where it was never met with tolerable;—
to go very slow and wait for the other carriage.
turning a corner which he could never bear to think of— and in strange hands —a mere common coachman —no James;
young people would be in such a hurry to marry —and to marry strangers too —
if she came home cold, she would be sure to warm herself thoroughly; if hungry, that she would take something to eat; that her own maid should sit up for her; and that Serle and the butler should see that every thing were safe in the house, as usual.
as for the ball, it was shocking to have dear Emma disappointed; but they would all be safer at home.
not sitting at the bottom of the table himself,
eight persons at dinner together as the utmost that his nerves could bear— and here would be a ninth —
he had done his duty, and made every fair lady welcome and easy.
to be allowed to hand her into the dining-parlour,
their promising never to go beyond the shrubbery again.
they were all very indifferent—
Mrs. Weston had been shewing them all to him, and now he would shew them all to Emma;—
might not have taken cold from his ride.—
James's being gone out to put the horses to, preparatory to their now daily drive to Randalls;
commended her very much for thinking of sending for Perry, and only
she had not done it.
While either of them protected him and his, Hartfield was safe.—