Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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mode of speech

speaker name

"Might he be trusted with the commission, what infinite pleasure should he have in executing it! he could ride to London at any time. It was impossible to say how much he should be gratified by being employed on such an errand."
a charade, which a friend of his had addressed to a young lady, the object of his admiration,
whether Mr. Woodhouse's party could be made up in the evening without him, or whether he should be in the smallest degree necessary at Hartfield. If he were, every thing else must give way; but otherwise his friend Cole had been saying so much about his dining with him— had made such a point of it, that he had promised him conditionally to come.
he had seen them go by, and had purposely followed them;
had been going to inquire, that he might carry some report of her to Hartfield—
he should call at Mrs. Goddard's for news of her fair friend, the last thing before he prepared for the happiness of meeting her again, when he hoped to be able to give a better report;
extremely anxious about her fair friend —her fair, lovely, amiable friend.
to refrain from visiting the sick-chamber again, for the present —
to promise him not to venture into such hazard till he had seen Mr. Perry and learnt his opinion;
availing himself of the precious opportunity,
sentiments which must be already well known,
ready to die if she refused him; but flattering himself that his ardent attachment and unequalled love and unexampled passion could not fail of having some effect,
her suspicion as most injurious,
his respect for Miss Smith as her friend,—
Miss Smith should be mentioned at all,—
a messenger had come over from Richmond soon after the return of the party from Box Hill —which messenger, however, had been no more than was expected; and that Mr. Churchill had sent his nephew a few lines, containing, upon the whole, a tolerable account of Mrs. Churchill, and only wishing him not to delay coming back beyond the next morning early; but that Mr. Frank Churchill having resolved to go home directly, without waiting at all, and his horse seeming to have got a cold, Tom had been sent off immediately for the Crown chaise, and the ostler had stood out and seen it pass by, the boy going a good pace, and driving very steady.