Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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had seen a collection of people in whom there was little beauty and no fashion, for none of whom he had felt the smallest interest, and from none received either attention or pleasure.
Miss Bennet
pretty, but she smiled too much.
she hardly had a good feature in her face,
her figure
light and pleasing;
her manners were not those of the fashionable world,
allowed the honour of her hand,
he could imagine but two motives for their choosing to walk up and down the room together, with either of which motives his joining them would interfere.
to be particularly careful that no sign of admiration should now escape him, nothing that could elevate her with the hope of influencing his felicity; sensible that if such an idea had been suggested, his behaviour during the last day must have material weight in confirming or crushing it.
whatever she wished him to say should be said.
if she and her sisters did not very often walk to Meryton.
to inquire
after the health of her family.
he had never been so fortunate as to meet Miss Bennet.
for his intrusion
he had understood all the ladies were to be within.
a wish of hearing that she were better.
her inferiority — of its being a degradation — of the family obstacles which judgment had always opposed to inclination,
the strength of that attachment which, in spite of all his endeavours, he had found impossible to conquer;
it would now be rewarded by her acceptance of his hand.
as to the time of her having left Longbourn, and of her having stayed in Derbyshire,
if she would do him the honour of introducing him to her friends.
to fish there as often as he chose while he continued in the neighbourhood,
to supply him with fishing tackle,
those parts of the stream where there was usually most sport.
business with his steward had occasioned his coming forward a few hours before the rest of the party with whom he had been travelling.
Bingley was also coming to wait on her;
their wish of seeing Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner, and Miss Bennet, to dinner at Pemberley, before they left the country.
the ladies of the family intended a visit to Georgiana that morning.
he perceived no other alteration than her being rather tanned, no miraculous consequence of travelling in the summer.
it a happier conclusion than there was at present reason to hope,
his compliments for her relations,
how Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner did,
The happiness which this reply produced, was such as he had
never felt before;
as sensibly and as warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do.
they were indebted for their present good understanding to the efforts of his aunt, who did call on him in her return through London, and there relate her journey to Longbourn, its motive, and the substance of her conversation with Elizabeth; dwelling emphatically on every expression of the latter which, in her ladyship's apprehension, peculiarly denoted her perverseness and assurance; in the belief that such a relation must assist her endeavours to obtain that promise from her nephew which she had refused to give.
of Georgiana's delight in her acquaintance, and of her disappointment at its sudden interruption; which naturally leading to the cause of that interruption,
his resolution of following her from Derbyshire in quest of her sister had been formed before he quitted the inn,
his gravity and thoughtfulness there had arisen from no other struggles than what such a purpose must comprehend.
with their engagement; his friend had given him the earliest information of it.
a great curiosity to see the view from the Mount,