Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


Your search returned 36 results



marriage status

class status



mode of speech

having so fine a family of daughters;
he had heard much of their beauty, but that in this instance fame had fallen short of the truth;
he did not doubt her seeing them all in due time well disposed of in marriage.
to which of his fair cousins the excellency of its cooking was owing.
begged pardon for having displeased her.
he never read novels.
he bore his young cousin no ill-will, and should never resent her behaviour as any affront,
his intrusion, without any previous acquaintance with her, which he could not help flattering himself, however, might be justified by his relationship to the young ladies who introduced him to her notice.
except Lady Catherine and her daughter, he had never seen a more elegant woman; for she had not only received him with the utmost civility, but had even pointedly included him in her invitation for the next evening, although utterly unknown to her before. Something, he supposed, might be attributed to his connection with them, but yet he had never met with so much attention in the whole course of his life.
he might almost have supposed himself in the small summer breakfast parlour at Rosings;
it was not of the least importance,
he considered the money as a mere trifle,
she would not make herself uneasy.
describing the civility of Mr. and Mrs . Phillips,
he did not in the least regard his losses at whist,
he crowded his cousins,
he had just been so fortunate as to make a most important discovery.
as to dancing, he was perfectly indifferent to it;
his chief object was by delicate attentions to recommend himself to her
he should therefore make a point of remaining close to her the whole evening.
the elegance of their entertainment, and the hospitality and politeness which had marked their behaviour to their guests.
with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.
to name the day that was to make him the happiest of men;
of his happiness in having obtained the affection of their amiable neighbour, Miss Lucas,
it was merely with the view of enjoying her society that he had been so ready to close with their kind wish of seeing him again at Longbourn, whither he hoped to be able to return on Monday fortnight; for Lady Catherine,
so heartily approved his marriage, that she wished it to take place as soon as possible, which he trusted would be an unanswerable argument with his amiable Charlotte to name an early day for making him the happiest of men.
shortly after his next return into Hertfordshire, the day would be fixed that was to make him the happiest of men.
his fair cousins health and happiness again,
their father another letter of thanks.
to his humble abode,
congratulate them on their good fortune,
recommend their being quick, as Lady Catherine very much objected to be kept waiting for her dinner.
to give her opinion of all that she had seen at Rosings,
his best respects to all her family,
his thanks for the kindness he had received at Longbourn in the winter, and his compliments to Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner, though unknown.
they had hitherto forgotten to leave any message for the ladies at Rosings.