Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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he should not go;
his wife's views on the stranger would be disappointed;
the horses were engaged.
he seemed very fortunate in his patroness. Lady Catherine de Bourgh's attention to his wishes, and consideration for his comfort, appeared very remarkable.
to read aloud to the ladies.
he acted very wisely in leaving the girls to their own trifling amusements.
to meet with folly and conceit in every other room of the house, he was used to be free from them there;
it gratified him,
to discover that Charlotte Lucas, whom he had been used to think tolerably sensible, was as foolish as his wife, and more foolish than his daughter!
her whole heart was in the subject,
Had he done his duty in that respect, Lydia need not have been indebted to her uncle for whatever of honour or credit could now be purchased for her.
The satisfaction of prevailing on one of the most worthless young men in Great Britain to be her husband might then have rested in its proper place.
He had never before supposed that, could Wickham be prevailed on to marry his daughter, it would be done with so little inconvenience to himself as by the present arrangement. He would scarcely be ten pounds a year the loser by the hundred that was to be paid them; for, what with her board and pocket allowance, and the continual presents in money which passed to her through her mother's hands, Lydia's expenses had been very little within that sum.
her husband would not advance a guinea to buy clothes for his daughter.
she should receive from him no mark of affection whatever on the occasion.
he was rising every hour in his esteem.
she submitted to the change without much reluctance.