Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status


mode of speech

Anhalt's last scene with the Baron admitted a good deal of action and emphasis,
it only as a vexatious interruption for the evening,
such an unlooked-for premature arrival as a most untoward event,
Sir Thomas had been twice as long on his passage, or were still in Antigua.
the possibility of the rehearsal being renewed after tea, when the bustle of receiving Sir Thomas were over, and he might be at leisure to be amused by it.
To be a second time disappointed in the same way was an instance of very severe ill-luck;
he should certainly attack the baronet on the absurdity of his proceedings, and argue him into a little more rationality.
He had known many disagreeable fathers before, and often been struck with the inconveniences they occasioned, but never, in the whole course of his life, had he seen one of that class so unintelligibly moral, so infamously tyrannical as Sir Thomas. He was not a man to be endured but for his children's sake, and he might be thankful to his fair daughter Julia that Mr. Yates did yet mean to stay a few days longer under his roof.