Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


Your search returned 17 results




marriage status

class status


mode of speech

she should not have a day's health all the autumn,
she might be able to leave it by dinner-time.
Mrs Musgrove was very apt not to give her the precedence that was her due, when they dined at the Great House with other families;
did not see any reason why she was to be considered so much at home as to lose her place.
That she was coming to apologize, and that they should have to spend the evening by themselves,
it would be quite a misfortune to have the existing connection between the families renewed -- very sad for herself and her children.
Louisa had got a much better somewhere,
Louisa had found a better seat somewhere else, and she would go on till she overtook her.
Anne, who was nothing to Louisa, while she was her sister, and had the best right to stay in Henrietta's stead! Why was not she to be as useful as Anne? And to go home without Charles, too, without her husband! No, it was too unkind.
when they dined with the Harvilles there had been only a maid-servant to wait, and at first Mrs Harville had always given Mrs Musgrove precedence; but then, she had received so very handsome an apology from her on finding out whose daughter she was, and there had been so much going on every day, there had been so many walks between their lodgings and the Harvilles, and she had got books from the library, and changed them so often, that the balance had certainly been much in favour of Lyme. She had been taken to Charmouth too, and she had bathed, and she had gone to church, and there were a great many more people to look at in the church at Lyme than at Uppercross;
their meeting with, or rather missing, Mr Elliot so extraordinarily.
still more positively that it was Mr Elliot,
to come and look for herself,
however determined to go to Camden Place herself, she should not think herself very well used, if they went to the play without her.
It was creditable to have a sister married,
with having been greatly instrumental to the connexion, by keeping Anne with her in the autumn; and as her own sister must be better than her husband's sisters, it was very agreeable that Captain Wentworth should be a richer man than either Captain Benwick or Charles Hayter.
Anne had no Uppercross Hall before her, no landed estate, no headship of a family; and if they could but keep Captain Wentworth from being made a baronet, she would not change situations with Anne.