Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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the Mr. Bertrams were very fine young men,
two such young men were not often seen together even in London,
their manners, particularly those of the eldest, were very good. He had been much in London, and had more liveliness and gallantry than Edmund, and must, therefore, be preferred; and, indeed, his being the eldest was another strong claim. She had felt an early presentiment that she should like the eldest best. She knew it was her way.
he and his situation might do.
a park, a real park, five miles round, a spacious modern-built house, so well placed and well screened as to deserve to be in any collection of engravings of gentlemen's seats in the kingdom, and wanting only to be completely new furnished— pleasant sisters, a quiet mother, and an agreeable man himself— with the advantage of being tied up from much gaming at present by a promise to his father, and of being Sir Thomas hereafter. It might do very well; she believed she should accept him;
It would be a very flat business, she was sure.
his lengthened absence from Mansfield, without anything but pleasure in view, and his own will to consult, made it perfectly clear that he did not care about her; and his indifference was so much more than equalled by her own,
that were he now to step forth the owner of Mansfield Park, the Sir Thomas complete, which he was to be in time, she did not believe she could accept him.
wishing she could work as well, and begging for the pattern, and supposing Fanny was now preparing for her appearance, as of course she would come out when her cousin was married,
if she had heard lately from her brother at sea,
she had quite a curiosity to see him, and imagined him a very fine young man,
Fanny to get his picture drawn before he went to sea again—
She could not come. Dr. Grant, professing an indisposition,
could not spare his wife.
to call again, to take them in her walk whenever she could, to come and hear more of the harp,
there would be a something to do and to suffer for it, which she could not think lightly of;
Edmund's being so soon to take orders, coming upon her like a blow that had been suspended, and still hoped uncertain and at a distance,
She had begun to think of him; she felt that she had, with great regard, with almost decided intentions;
but she would now meet him with his own cool feelings.
It was plain that he could have no serious views, no true attachment, by fixing himself in a situation which he must know she would never stoop to. She would learn to match him in his indifference. She would henceforth admit his attentions without any idea beyond immediate amusement. If he could so command his affections, hers should do her no harm.
the church, sink the clergyman, and see only the respectable, elegant, modernised, and occasional residence of a man of independent fortune,
as the destroyer of all this,
It was time to have done with cards, if sermons prevailed;
the dear friend's letter, which claimed a long visit from her in London,
the kindness of Henry, in engaging to remain where he was till January, that he might convey her thither;
though she felt she must go, and knew she should enjoy herself when once away, she was already looking forward to being at Mansfield again.
Fanny's returning with her in a much more cordial manner than before,
their going up into her room, where they might have a comfortable coze, without disturbing Dr. and Mrs. Grant, who were together in the drawing-room.
to chuse from among several gold chains and necklaces.
Fanny's taking one for the cross and to keep for her sake,
They were now a miserable trio, confined within doors by a series of rain and snow, with nothing to do and no variety to hope for.
His absence was unnecessarily long. He should not have planned such an absence —he should not have left home for a week, when her own departure from Mansfield was so near.
She wished she had not spoken so warmly in their last conversation. She was afraid she had used some strong, some contemptuous expressions in speaking of the clergy, and that should not have been. It was ill-bred; it was wrong. She wished such words unsaid with all her heart.
he had actually written home to defer his return, having promised to remain some days longer with his friend.
His friend Mr. Owen had sisters; he might find them attractive.
Had Henry returned, as he talked of doing, at the end of three or four days, she should now have been leaving Mansfield.
there could not be two persons in existence whose characters and manners were less accordant: time would discover it to him;