Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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her admiration of Captain Carter,
her hope of seeing him in the course of the day, as he was going the next morning to London.
having promised on his first coming into the country to give a ball at Netherfield.
it would be the most shameful thing in the world if he did not keep it.
a visit to Brighton comprised every possibility of earthly happiness.
the streets of that gay bathing-place covered with officers.
herself the object of attention, to tens and to scores of them at present unknown.
all the glories of the camp — its tents stretched forth in beauteous uniformity of lines, crowded with the young and the gay, and dazzling with scarlet; and, to complete the view,
herself seated beneath a tent, tenderly flirting with at least six officers at once.
they were just returned from the library, where such and such officers had attended them, and where she had seen such beautiful ornaments as made her quite wild; that she had a new gown, or a new parasol, which she would have described more fully, but was obliged to leave off in a violent hurry, as Mrs. Forster called her, and they were going off to the camp;
her dear Wickham
no one was to be put in competition with him. He did every thing best in the world;
he would kill more birds on the first of September, than any body else in the country.