Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status


mode of speech

against there being any hurry;
only wanted him to wait till Sir Thomas's return, and then Sir Thomas might settle it all himself. He would be at home in September, and where would be the harm of only waiting till September?
how dreadfully she must have missed him, and how impossible it would have been for her to bear a lengthened absence.
Fanny, preparing for a ball, might be glad of better help than the upper housemaid's,
being waited for,
he had got the very speech.
very little more than that Sir Thomas thought Fanny ought to go, and therefore that she must.
any necessity for Fanny's ever going near a father and mother who had done without her so long, while she was so useful to herself.
to write to her soon and often,
to be a good correspondent herself;
The fever was subdued; the fever had been his complaint; of course he would soon be well again.
her, as Fanny's sister, to have a claim at Mansfield,