Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status


mode of speech

how they did,
they both looked very ugly.
horses which he had bought for a trifle and sold for incredible sums;
racing matches, in which his judgment had infallibly foretold the winner;
shooting parties, in which he had killed more birds (though without having one good shot) than all his companions together;
some famous day’s sport, with the fox-hounds, in which his foresight and skill in directing the dogs had repaired the mistakes of the most experienced huntsman, and in which the boldness of his riding,
though it had never endangered his own life for a moment,
had been constantly leading others into difficulties,
had broken the necks of many.
he had never seen two men so much alike in his life,
what was the matter.
whether she had seen him talking with General Tilney:
it would be in vain to go after the Tilneys; they were turning the corner into Brock Street, when he had overtaken them, and were at home by this time.
being one of the finest fellows in the world,
her therefore as the almost acknowledged future heiress of Fullerton
to have been totally mistaken in his opinion of their circumstances and character, misled by the rhodomontade of his friend to believe his father a man of substance and credit, whereas the transactions of the two or three last weeks proved him to be neither; for after coming eagerly forward on the first overture of a marriage between the families, with the most liberal proposals, he had, on being brought to the point by the shrewdness of the relator, been constrained to acknowledge himself incapable of giving the young people even a decent support. They were, in fact, a necessitous family; numerous, too, almost beyond example; by no means respected in their own neighbourhood, as he had lately had particular opportunities of discovering; aiming at a style of life which their fortune could not warrant; seeking to better themselves by wealthy connections; a forward, bragging, scheming race.
The Allens,
had lived near them too long, and he knew the young man on whom the Fullerton estate must devolve.