Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status

mode of speech

quietly whether there were any doubts of the air of Randalls.
a seat in his carriage, if the weather were Mr. Elton's only objection,
the ground being covered with snow, and of its still snowing fast, with a strong drifting wind;
Mrs. Elton, as elegant as lace and pearls could make her,
only to observe enough for Isabella's information— but Miss Fairfax was an old acquaintance and a quiet girl, and he could talk to her.
That a man who might have spent his evening quietly at home after a day of business in London, should set off again, and walk half a mile to another man's house, for the sake of being in mixed company till bed-time, of finishing his day in the efforts of civility and the noise of numbers,
A man who had been in motion since eight o'clock in the morning, and might now have been still, who had been long talking, and might have been silent, who had been in more than one crowd, and might have been alone!—Such a man, to quit the tranquillity and independence of his own fireside, and on the evening of a cold sleety April day rush out again into the world!—
Could he by a touch of his finger have instantly taken back his wife, there would have been a motive; but his coming would probably prolong rather than break up the party.