Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status

mode of speech

to do every thing in his power to make them comfortable.
to increase the fortunes of his sisters by the present of a thousand pounds a-piece.
she would not be settled far from Norland.
how exceedingly sorry he was that she had taken a house at such a distance from Norland as to prevent his being of any service to her in removing her furniture.
he and his wife were to be in town before the middle of February,
The expense would be nothing, the inconvenience not more;
it was altogether an attention
requisite to its complete enfranchisement from his promise to his father.
another year would make the invitation needless, by bringing Elinor to town as Colonel Brandon's wife, and Marianne as THEIR visitor.
he really believed there was no material danger in Fanny's indisposition, and that they need not therefore be very uneasy about it,
their travelling so far towards Barton without any expense, and on Colonel Brandon's being to follow them to Cleveland in a day or two,
Mrs. Ferrars was the most unfortunate of women — poor Fanny had suffered agonies of sensibility —
Robert's offence was unpardonable, but Lucy's was infinitely worse. Neither of them were ever again to be mentioned to Mrs. Ferrars; and even, if she might hereafter be induced to forgive her son, his wife should never be acknowledged as her daughter, nor be permitted to appear in her presence. The secrecy with which everything had been carried on between them, was rationally treated as enormously heightening the crime, because, had any suspicion of it occurred to the others, proper measures would have been taken to prevent the marriage;
join with him in regretting that Lucy's engagement with Edward had not rather been fulfilled, than that she should thus be the means of spreading misery farther in the family. —