Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status


mode of speech

he must be a charming young man, and was equally sure that he must have been delighted with her dear Catherine, and would therefore shortly return.
John thought her the most charming girl in the world,
should induce her to join the set before her dear Catherine could join it too.
It was inconceivable, incredible, impossible!
no two hours and a half had ever gone off so swiftly before,
It was ages since she had had a moment’s conversation with her dearest Catherine; and, though she had such thousands of things to say to her, it appeared as if they were never to be together again;
“quite horrid.”
her dearest, sweetest Catherine would not seriously refuse such a trifling request to a friend who loved her so dearly. She knew her beloved Catherine to have so feeling a heart, so sweet a temper, to be so easily persuaded by those she loved.
having more affection for Miss Tilney, though she had known her so little a while, than for her best and oldest friends, with being grown cold and indifferent, in short, towards herself.
Her heart and faith were alike engaged to James.
he would go.
“It was all pride, pride, insufferable haughtiness and pride! She had long suspected the family to be very high, and this made it certain. Such insolence of behaviour as Miss Tilney’s she had never heard of in her life! Not to do the honours of her house with common good breeding! To behave to her guest with such superciliousness! Hardly even to speak to her!”
She was so amazingly tired, and it was so odious to parade about the pump-room; and if she moved from her seat she should miss her sisters; she was expecting her sisters every moment; so that her dearest Catherine must excuse her, and must sit quietly down again.