Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status


mode of speech

he had quitted it for a week, on the very morning after his having had the pleasure of seeing her.
make room for him,
knew nothing about it; but his father, like every military man, had a very large acquaintance.
her having a great deal of natural taste.
foregrounds, distances, and second distances — side-screens and perspectives — lights and shades;
to dance.
His sister,
was uncomfortably circumstanced — she had no female companion — and, in the frequent absence of her father, was sometimes without any companion at all.
her having been undisturbed by the tempest,
for his appearance there,
after what had passed he had little right to expect a welcome at Fullerton,
his impatience to be assured of Miss Morland’s having reached her home in safety, as the cause of his intrusion.
if Mr. and Mrs. Allen were now at Fullerton?
the meaning,
his intention of paying his respects to them,
if she would have the goodness to show him the way.
On his return from Woodston, two days before, he had been met near the abbey by his impatient father, hastily informed in angry terms of
and ordered