Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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was quite at his service in any way that could be useful.
the greater desirableness of some carriage which might convey more than two.
It was the very thing of all others to be wished, it was the best, it was the only way of proceeding with any advantage,
and he directly saw a knoll not half a mile off, which would give them exactly the requisite command of the house.
that might not be thought of: he was very sure his sister had no wish of acting but as she might be useful,
she would not allow herself to be considered in the present case.
neither he nor Julia had ever had a serious thought of each other,
by all means to pay his respects to Sir Thomas without delay,
whether there were any plans for resuming the play after the present happy interruption
because, in that case, he should make a point of returning to Mansfield at any time required by the party: he was going away immediately, being to meet his uncle at Bath without delay; but if there were any prospect of a renewal of Lovers' Vows, he should hold himself positively engaged, he should break through every other claim, he should absolutely condition with his uncle for attending them whenever he might be wanted. The play should not be lost by his absence.
to apply for information as to the probable period of the Antwerp's return from the Mediterranean, etc.;
She had feeling, genuine feeling.It would be something to be loved by such a girl, to excite the first ardours of her young unsophisticated mind!
She interested him more than he had foreseen. A fortnight was not enough.
he wished he had been a William Price, distinguishing himself and working his way to fortune and consequence with so much self-respect and happy ardour, instead of what he was!
to be allowed to sit between her ladyship and Miss Price, and teach them both,
They had been hunting together, and were in the midst of a good run, and at some distance from Mansfield, when his horse being found to have flung a shoe, Henry Crawford had been obliged to give up, and make the best of his way back.
to rent the house himself the following winter, that he might have a home of his own in that neighbourhood; and it was not merely for the use of it in the hunting-season
though that consideration had certainly some weight, feeling as he did that, in spite of all Dr. Grant's very great kindness, it was impossible for him and his horses to be accommodated where they now were without material inconvenience;
but his attachment to that neighbourhood did not depend upon one amusement or one season of the year: he had set his heart upon having a something there that he could come to at any time, a little homestall at his command, where all the holidays of his year might be spent, and he might find himself continuing, improving, and perfecting that friendship and intimacy with the Mansfield Park family which was increasing in value to him every day.
he could not for the life of him recall what her dancing had been,
as he found himself obliged to go to London on the morrow for a few days, he could not help trying to procure a companion; and therefore hoped that if William could make up his mind to leave Mansfield half a day earlier than had been proposed, he would accept a place in his carriage. Mr. Crawford meant to be in town by his uncle's accustomary late dinner-hour, and William was invited to dine with him at the Admiral's.
he had been sitting with Lady Bertram and Fanny.
Fanny's beauty of face and figure, Fanny's graces of manner and goodness of heart,
The gentleness, modesty, and sweetness of her character
Her temper he had good reason to depend on and to praise. He had often seen it tried. Was there one of the family, excepting Edmund, who had not in some way or other continually exercised her patience and forbearance? Her affections were evidently strong. To see her with her brother! What could more delightfully prove that the warmth of her heart was equal to its gentleness? What could be more encouraging to a man who had her love in view? Then, her understanding was beyond every suspicion, quick and clear; and her manners were the mirror of her own modest and elegant mind.
her having such a steadiness and regularity of conduct, such a high notion of honour, and such an observance of decorum as might warrant any man in the fullest dependence on her faith and integrity,
His last journey to London had been undertaken with no other view than that of introducing her brother in Hill Street, and prevailing on the Admiral to exert whatever interest he might have for getting him on. This had been his business. He had communicated it to no creature: he had not breathed a syllable of it even to Mary; while uncertain of the issue, he could not have borne any participation of his feelings, but this had been his business;
deepest interest
twofold motives
views and wishes more than could be told
she had created sensations which his heart had never known before, and that everything he had done for William was to be placed to the account of his excessive and unequalled attachment to her,
He had a note to deliver from his sister.
she did love him, though she might not know it herself;
he should be able in time to make those feelings what he wished.
He would not despair: he would not desist. He had every well-grounded reason for solid attachment; he knew her to have all the worth that could justify the warmest hopes of lasting happiness with her;
her rather as one who had never thought on the subject enough to be in danger; who had been guarded by youth, a youth of mind as lovely as of person; whose modesty had prevented her from understanding his attentions, and who was still overpowered by the suddenness of addresses so wholly unexpected, and the novelty of a situation which her fancy had never taken into account.
Must it not follow of course, that, when he was understood, he should succeed?
Love such as his, in a man like himself, must with perseverance secure a return, and at no great distance;
there being anything uncongenial in their characters, or anything unfriendly in their situations; and positively declared, that he would still love, and still hope!
If Lady Bertram, with all her incompetency and languor, could feel this, the inference of what her niece, alive and enlightened as she was, must feel, was elevating.
his opinion and give his own as to the properest manner in which particular passages in the service should be delivered,
to know her meaning;
He had reached it late the night before, was come for a day or two, was staying at the Crown, had accidentally met with a navy officer or two of his acquaintance since his arrival,
he had spent half an hour with his sister the evening before his leaving London;
she had sent her best and kindest love, but had had no time for writing;
he thought himself lucky in seeing Mary for even half an hour, having spent scarcely twenty-four hours in London, after his return from Norfolk, before he set off again;
her cousin Edmund was in town, had been in town, he understood, a few days;
he had not seen him himself, but
he was well, had left them all well at Mansfield, and was to dine, as yesterday, with the Frasers.
if the Miss Prices were not afraid of the fatigue;