Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status

mode of speech

To take three thousand pounds from the fortune of their dear little boy would be impoverishing him to the most dreadful degree.
She begged him to think again on the subject.
How could he answer it to himself to rob his child, and his only child too, of so large a sum? And what possible claim could the Miss Dashwoods, who were related to him only by half blood, which she considered as no relationship at all, have on his generosity to so large an amount.
It was very well known that no affection was ever supposed to exist between the children of any man by different marriages;
why was he to ruin himself, and their
poor little Harry,
by giving away fall his money to his half sisters?
her brother's great expectations, of Mrs. Ferrars's resolution that both her sons should marry well, and of the danger attending any young woman who attempted to DRAW HIM IN;
one of the most charming women in the world!
they were done by Miss Dashwood.
her mother had been quite rude enough, —
the exceedingly great inconvenience of sending her carriage for the Miss Dashwoods,
who could tell that they might not expect to go out with her a second time?
to request her company and her sister's, for some days, in Harley Street, as soon as Lady Middleton could spare them.
whether she should ever be able to part with them.
concerned to find that Elinor and her sister were so soon to leave town, as she had hoped to see more of them;
to come to Norland whenever it should happen to be in their way,
in Miss Morton he would have a woman of higher rank and larger fortune;
Miss Morton was the daughter of a nobleman with thirty thousand pounds, while Miss Dashwood was only the daughter of a private gentleman with no more than THREE;