Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


Your search returned 19 results



marriage status

class status


mode of speech

being still quite as handsome as ever,
her approach to the years of danger,
being properly solicited by baronet-blood within the next twelvemonth or two.
extremely agreeable,
only in him a proper match for Sir Walter Elliot's eldest daughter.
The disgrace of his first marriage might, perhaps, as there was no reason to suppose it perpetuated by offspring, have been got over, had he not done worse; but he had,
spoken most disrespectfully of them all, most slightingly and contemptuously of the very blood he belonged to, and the honours which were hereafter to be his own.
This could not be pardoned.
that when he now took up the Baronetage, it was to drive the heavy bills of his tradespeople, and the unwelcome hints of Mr Shepherd, his agent, from his thoughts.
what could be done,
to cut off some unnecessary charities, and to refrain from new furnishing the drawing-room;
their taking no present down to Anne,
as a most important and valuable assistant to the latter in all the business before her.
how such an absurd suspicion should occur to her,
Mr Elliot was in Bath. He had called in Camden Place; had called a second time, a third; had been pointedly attentive. If Elizabeth and her father did not deceive themselves, had been taking much pains to seek the acquaintance, and proclaim the value of the connection, as he had formerly taken pains to shew neglect.
it be a great extenuation.
Mrs Clay had a little cold already,
he had called and paid them a long morning visit;
he was coming again in the evening.