Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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it was not likely to be discovered by the world in general, since Jane united, with great strength of feeling, a composure of temper and a uniform cheerfulness of manner which would guard her from the suspicions of the impertinent.
Jane was by no means better.
she would amuse herself for the short time she could stay below, with a book.
she could suit herself perfectly with those in the room.
her sister was worse, and that she could not leave her.
to have a note sent to Longbourn, desiring her mother to visit Jane, and form her own judgement of her situation.
if Charlotte Lucas had been at Longbourn since her coming away.
the carriage might be sent for them in the course of the day.
What could be the meaning of it?
she had neither been seeing him before, nor thinking of him since, with the smallest degree of unreasonable admiration.
the commonest, dullest, most threadbare topic might be rendered interesting by the skill of the speaker.
“A young man, too, like you, whose very countenance may vouch for your being amiable”
he had given a very rational account of it,
whether he intended to accept Mr. Bingley's invitation, and if he did, whether he would think it proper to join in the evening's amusement;
to have Mr. Collins instead!
she was selected from among her sisters as worthy of being the mistress of Hunsford Parsonage, and of assisting to form a quadrille table at Rosings, in the absence of more eligible visitors.
Mr. Collins might never make the offer, and till he did, it was useless to quarrel about him.
his being purposely omitted for Mr. Darcy's pleasure in the Bingleys' invitation to the officers;
their silence was to last through the two dances,
it would be the greater punishment to her partner to oblige him to talk,
Mr. Darcy would consider his addressing him without introduction as an impertinent freedom, rather than a compliment to his aunt;
it was not in the least necessary there should be any notice on either side;
if it were, it must belong to Mr. Darcy, the superior in consequence, to begin the acquaintance.
had her family made an agreement to expose themselves as much as they could during the evening, it would have been impossible for them to play their parts with more spirit or finer success;
some of the exhibition had escaped his notice,
his feelings were not of a sort to be much distressed by the folly which he must have witnessed.
to stand up with somebody else,
to introduce him to any young lady in the room.
if he persisted in considering her repeated refusals as flattering encouragement, to apply to her father, whose negative might be uttered in such a manner as to be decisive, and whose behavior at least could not be mistaken for the affectation and coquetry of an elegant female.
it was.
it was not to be supposed that their absence from Netherfield would prevent Mr. Bingley's being there;
Jane must soon cease to regard it, in the enjoyment of his.
merely the suggestion of Caroline's interested wishes,
those wishes, however openly or artfully spoken, could influence a young man so totally independent of everyone.
the prospect of their relationship was highly grateful to her,
she wished her all imaginable happiness.
The strangeness of Mr. Collins's making two offers of marriage within three days was nothing in comparison of his being now accepted.
Charlotte's opinion of matrimony was not exactly like her own, but she had not supposed it to be possible that, when called into action, she would have sacrificed every better feeling to worldly advantage.
Charlotte the wife of Mr. Collins was a most humiliating picture!
And to the pang of a friend disgracing herself and sunk in her esteem, was added the distressing conviction that it was impossible for that friend to be tolerably happy in the lot she had chosen.
no real confidence could ever subsist between them again.
his sisters would be successful in keeping him away.
The united efforts of his two unfeeling sisters and of his overpowering friend, assisted by the attractions of Miss Darcy and the amusements of London might be too much,
for the strength of his attachment.
that easiness of temper, that want of proper resolution, which now made him the slave of his designing friends, and led him to sacrifice of his own happiness to the caprice of their inclination. Had his own happiness, however, been the only sacrifice, he might have been allowed to sport with it in whatever manner he thought best, but her sister's was involved in it, as she thought he must be sensible himself.
whether Bingley's regard had really died away, or were suppressed by his friends' interference; whether he had been aware of Jane's attachment, or whether it had escaped his observation; whatever were the case, though her opinion of him must be materially affected by the difference, her sister's situation remained the same, her peace equally wounded.
his attentions to Jane had been merely the effect of a common and transient liking, which ceased when he saw her no more;
she did not consider it entirely hopeless. It was possible, and
probable, that his affection might be reanimated, and the influence of his friends successfully combated by the more natural influence of Jane's attractions.
all the comfort of intimacy was over,