Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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“It seems likely to have been a desirable match for Jane,”
“I am sorry it went off. But these things happen so often! A young man, such as you describe Mr. Bingley, so easily falls in love with a pretty girl for a few weeks, and when accident separates them, so easily forgets her, that these sort of inconsistencies are very frequent.”
“But that expression of 'violently in in love' is so hackneyed, so doubtful, so indefinite, that it gives me very little idea. It is as often applied to feelings which arise only from a half-hour's acquaintance, as to a real, strong attachment. Pray, how violent was Mr. Bingley's love?”
“Oh, yes! — of that kind of love which I suppose him to have felt. Poor Jane! I am sorry for her, because, with her disposition, she may not get over it immediately. It had better have happened to you, Lizzy; you would have laughed yourself out of it sooner. But do you think she would be prevailed upon to go back with us? Change of scene might be of service — and perhaps a little relief from home may be as useful as anything.”
“I hope,”
"that no consideration with regard to this young man will influence her. We live in so different a part of town, all our connections are so different, and, as you well know, we go out so little, that it is very improbable that they should meet at all, unless he really comes to see her.”
“So much the better. I hope they will not meet at all. But does not Jane correspond with his sister? She will not be able to help calling.”
“You are too sensible a girl, Lizzy, to fall in love merely because you are warned against it; and, therefore, I am not afraid of speaking openly. Seriously, I would have you be on your guard. Do not involve yourself or endeavour to involve him in an affection which the want of fortune would make so very imprudent. I have nothing to say against him; he is a most interesting young man; and if he had the fortune he ought to have, I should think you could not do better. But as it is, you must not let your fancy run away with you. You have sense, and we all expect you to use it. Your father would depend on your resolution and good conduct, I am sure. You must not disappoint your father.”
“Yes, and I hope to engage you to be serious likewise.”
“Elizabeth, you are not serious now.”
“Perhaps it will be as well if you discourage his coming here so very often. At least, you should not remind your mother of inviting him.”
“But my dear Elizabeth,”
“what sort of girl is Miss King? I should be sorry to think our friend mercenary.”
“If you will only tell me what sort of girl Miss King is, I shall know what to think.”
“But he paid her not the smallest attention till her grandfather's death made her mistress of this fortune.”
“But there seems an indelicacy in directing his attentions towards her so soon after this event.”
“Her not objecting does not justify him. It only shows her being deficient in something herself — sense or feeling.”
“No, Lizzy, that is what I do not choose. I should be sorry, you know, to think ill of a young man who has lived so long in Derbyshire.”
“Take care, Lizzy; that speech savours strongly of disappointment.”
“We have not quite determined how far it shall carry us,”
“but, perhaps, to the Lakes.”
“My love, should not you like to see a place of which you have heard so much?”
“a place, too, with which so many of your acquaintances are connected. Wickham passed all his youth there, you know.”
“If it were merely a fine house richly furnished,”
“I should not care about it myself; but the grounds are delightful. They have some of the finest woods in the country.”
“I have heard much of your master's fine person,”
“it is a handsome face. But, Lizzy, you can tell us whether it is like or not.”
“His father was an excellent man,”
“This fine account of him,”
is not quite consistent with his behaviour to our poor friend.”
“That is not very likely; our authority was too good.”
“for your housekeeper,”
“informed us that you would certainly not be here till to-morrow; and indeed, before we left Bakewell, we understood that you were not immediately expected in the country.”
“There is something a little stately in him, to be sure,”
“but it is confined to his air, and is not unbecoming. I can now say with the housekeeper, that though some people may call him proud, I have seen nothing of it.”
“To be sure, Lizzy,”
“he is not so handsome as Wickham; or, rather, he has not Wickham's countenance, for his features are perfectly good. But how came you to tell me that he was so disagreeable?”
“From what we have seen of him,”
“I really should not have thought that he could have behaved in so cruel a way by anybody, as he has done by poor Wickham. He has not an ill-natured look. On the contrary, there is something pleasing about his mouth when he speaks. And there is something of dignity in his countenance that would not give one an unfavourable idea of his heart. But, to be sure, the good lady who showed us his house did give him a most flaming character! I could hardly help laughing aloud sometimes. But he is a liberal master, I suppose, and that in the eye of a servant comprehends every virtue.”
“But what is to be done about Pemberley?”
“John told us Mr. Darcy was here when you sent for us; was it so?”
“What is all settled?”
“And are they upon such terms as for her to disclose the real truth? Oh, that I knew how it was!”
“Upon my word,”
“I begin to be of your uncle's opinion. It is really too great a violation of decency, honour, and interest, for him to be guilty of it. I cannot think so very ill of Wickham. Can you yourself, Lizzy, so wholly give him up, as to believe him capable of it?”
“But you see that Jane,”
“does not think so very ill of Wickham as to believe him capable of the attempt.”
“And do you really know all this?”
“But does Lydia know nothing of this? can she be ignorant of what you and Jane seem so well to understand?”
“When they all removed to Brighton, therefore, you had no reason, I suppose, to believe them fond of each other?”