Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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“Come, Darcy,”
“I must have you dance. I hate to see you standing about by yourself in this stupid manner. You had much better dance.”
“I would not be so fastidious as you are,”
“for a kingdom! Upon my honour, I never met with so many pleasant girls in my life as I have this evening; and there are several of them you see uncommonly pretty.”
“Oh! She is the most beautiful creature I ever beheld! But there is one of her sisters sitting down just behind you, who is very pretty, and I dare say very agreeable. Do let me ask my partner to introduce you.”
“Your picture may be very exact, Louisa,”
“but this was all lost upon me. I thought Miss Elizabeth Bennet looked remarkably well when she came into the room this morning. Her dirty petticoat quite escaped my notice.”
“It shows an affection for her sister that is very pleasing,”
“If they had uncles enough to fill all Cheapside,”
“it would not make them one jot less agreeable.”
“In nursing your sister I am sure you have pleasure,”
“and I hope it will be soon increased by seeing her quite well.”
“And I wish my collection were larger for your benefit and my own credit; but I am an idle fellow, and though I have not many, I have more than I ever looked into.”
“With all my heart; I will buy Pemberley itself if Darcy will sell it.”
“Upon my word, Caroline, I should think it more possible to get Pemberley by purchase than by imitation.”
“It is amazing to me,”
“how young ladies can have patience to be so very accomplished as they all are.”
“Yes, all of them, I think. They all paint tables, cover screens, and net purses. I scarcely know anyone who cannot do all this, and I am sure
I never heard a young lady spoken of for the first time, without being informed that
“It must not be thought of. My sister, I am sure, will not hear of her removal.”
“Whatever I do is done in a hurry,”
“and therefore if I should resolve to quit Netherfield, I should probably be off in five minutes. At present, however, I consider myself as quite fixed here.”
“You begin to comprehend me, do you?”
“I wish I might take this for a compliment; but to be so easily seen through I am afraid is pitiful.”
“I did not know before,”
“that you were a studier of character. It must be an amusing study.”
“When I am in the country,”
“I never wish to leave it; and when I am in town it is pretty much the same. They have each their advantages, and I can be equally happy in either.”
“Did Charlotte dine with you?”
“She seems a very pleasant young woman.”
“I am perfectly ready, I assure you, to keep my engagement; and when your sister is recovered, you shall, if you please, name the very day of the ball. But you would not wish to be dancing when she is ill.”
“That will not do for a compliment to Darcy, Caroline,”
“because he does not write with ease. He studies too much for words of four syllables. Do not you, Darcy?”
“My ideas flow so rapidly that I have not time to express them — by which means my letters sometimes convey no ideas at all to my correspondents.”
“And which of the two do you call my little recent piece of modesty?”
“this is too much, to remember at night all the foolish things that were said in the morning. And yet, upon my honour, I believe what I said of myself to be true, and I believe it at this moment. At least, therefore, I did not assume the character of needless precipitance merely to show off before the ladies.”
“I am exceedingly gratified,”
“by your converting what my friend says into a compliment on the sweetness of my temper. But I am afraid you are giving it a turn which that gentleman did by no means intend; for he would certainly think the better of me, if under such a circumstance I were to give a flat denial, and ride off as fast as I could.”
“Upon my word, I cannot exactly explain the matter, Darcy must speak for himself.”
“By all means,”
“let us hear all the particulars, not forgetting their comparative height and size; for that will have more weight in the argument, Miss Bennet, than you may be aware of. I assure you, that if Darcy were not such a great tall fellow, in comparison with myself, I should not pay him half so much deference. I declare I do not know a more awful object than Darcy, on particular occasions, and in particular places; at his own house especially, and of a Sunday evening, when he has nothing to do.”
“Perhaps I do. Arguments are too much like disputes. If you and Miss Bennet will defer yours till I am out of the room, I shall be very thankful; and then you may say whatever you like of me.”
“If you mean Darcy,”
“he may go to bed, if he chooses, before it begins — but as for the ball, it is quite a settled thing; and as soon as Nicholls has made white soup enough, I shall send round my cards.”
“Much more rational, my dear Caroline, I dare say, but it would not be near so much like a ball.”
“It is above eight months. We have not met since the 26th of November, when we were all dancing together at Netherfield.”
“Where is your sister?”
“Mrs. Bennet, have you no more lanes hereabouts in which Lizzy may lose her way again to-day?”