Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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"There could be no harm in her liking an agreeable man— everybody knew her situation —Mr. Crawford must take care of himself."
"Your best friend upon such an occasion,"
"would be Mr. Repton, I imagine."
"The avenue! Oh! I do not recollect it. I really know very little of Sotherton."
"and her spirits are as good, and she has the same energy of character. I cannot but think that good horsemanship has a great deal to do with the mind."
"I know that Mr. Crawford depends upon taking us. After what passed at first, he would claim it as a promise."
"That would not be a very handsome reason for using Mr. Crawford's,"
"but the truth is, that Wilcox is a stupid old fellow, and does not know how to drive. I will answer for it that we shall find no inconvenience from narrow roads on Wednesday."
"oh dear! I believe it would be generally thought the favourite seat. There can be no comparison as to one's view of the country. Probably Miss Crawford will choose the barouche-box herself."
"It seems very odd,"
"that you should be staying at home instead of Fanny."
"those woods belonged to Sotherton,"
"she believed that it was now all Mr. Rushworth's property on each side of the road,"
"If he would give her away?"
"My dear Fanny, how comes this?"
"Poor dear Fanny,"
"how ill you have been used by them! You had better have staid with us."
"Yes, there is nothing else to be done. But now, sincerely, do not you find the place altogether worse than you expected?"
"You are too much a man of the world not to see with the eyes of the world. If other people think Sotherton improved, I have no doubt that you will."
"You seemed to enjoy your drive here very much this morning. I was glad to see you so well entertained. You and Julia were laughing the whole way."
"You think her more light-hearted than I am?"
"Naturally, I believe, I am as lively as Julia, but I have more to think of now."
"Do you mean literally or figuratively? Literally, I conclude. Yes, certainly, the sun shines, and the park looks very cheerful. But unluckily that iron gate, that ha-ha, give me a feeling of restraint and hardship. 'I cannot get out,' as the starling said."
"Mr. Rushworth is so long fetching this key!"
"Prohibited! nonsense! I certainly can get out that way, and I will. Mr. Rushworth will be here in a moment, you know; we shall not be out of sight."
"Thank you, my dear Fanny, but I and my gown are alive and well, and so good-bye."
"I think you have done pretty well yourself, ma'am. Your lap seems full of good things, and here is a basket of something between us which has been knocking my elbow unmercifully."
"What else have you been spunging?"
"I believe we must be satisfied with less,"
"There would not be time, and other difficulties would arise. We must rather adopt Mr. Crawford's views, and make the performance, not the theatre, our object. Many parts of our best plays are independent of scenery."
"I am sure I would give up the part to Julia most willingly, but that though I shall probably do it very ill, I feel persuaded she would do it worse,"
"I take the part which Lady Ravenshaw was to have done, and"
"Miss Crawford is to be Amelia."
"We see things very differently,"
"I am perfectly acquainted with the play, I assure you; and with a very few omissions, and so forth, which will be made, of course, I can see nothing objectionable in it; and I am not the only young woman you find who thinks it very fit for private representation."
"I am much obliged to you, Edmund; you mean very well, I am sure: but I still think you see things too strongly; and I really cannot undertake to harangue all the rest upon a subject of this kind. There would be the greatest indecorum, I think."
"If I were to decline the part,"
"Julia would certainly take it."
"Oh! she might think the difference between us— the difference in our situations —that she need not be so scrupulous as I might feel necessary. I am sure she would argue so. No; you must excuse me; I cannot retract my consent; it is too far settled, everybody would be so disappointed, Tom would be quite angry; and if we are so very nice, we shall never act anything."
"And I do believe she can say every word of it,"
"for she could put Mrs. Grant right the other day in twenty places. Fanny, I am sure you know the part."
"It is time to think of our visitors,"
"Where did you leave Miss Crawford, Fanny?"