Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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"that it rained very hard,"
"I hope he has had no bad news,"
"It must be something extraordinary that could make Colonel Brandon leave my breakfast table so suddenly."
"My dear madam,"
"recollect what you are saying."
"I hope we shall see you at Barton,"
"as soon as you can conveniently leave town; and we must put off the party to Whitwell till you return."
"Did not I tell you, Sir John, when you spoke to me about it before, that it could not be done? They dined with us last."
"John is in such spirits today!"
"He is full of monkey tricks."
"How playful William is!"
"And here is my sweet little Annamaria,"
"And she is always so gentle and quiet — Never was there such a quiet little thing!"
"I am glad,"
"you are not going to finish poor little Annamaria's basket this evening; for I am sure it must hurt your eyes to work filigree by candlelight. And we will make the dear little love some amends for her disappointment to-morrow, and then I hope she will not much mind it."
"You are very good, I hope it won't hurt your eyes — will you ring the bell for some working candles? My poor little girl would be sadly disappointed, I know, if the basket was not finished tomorrow, for though I told her it certainly would not, I am sure she depends upon having it done."
"You are very kind,"
"and as you really like the work, perhaps you will be as well pleased not to cut in till another rubber, or will you take your chance now?"
"It is very shocking, indeed!"