Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


Your search returned 107 results




marriage status

class status


speaker name

"I think we cannot do better,"
"let us send for the child."
"Where shall the child come to first, sister, to you or to us?"
"Then she had better come to us,"
"I hope she will not tease my poor pug,"
"I have but just got Julia to leave it alone."
"she could only say it was very unlucky, but some people were stupid, and Fanny must take more pains: she did not know what else was to be done; and, except her being so dull, she must add she saw no harm in the poor little thing, and always found her very handy and quick in carrying messages, and fetching what she wanted."
"So, Fanny, you are going to leave us, and live with my sister. How shall you like it?"
"Yes, my dear; why should you be astonished? You have been five years with us, and my sister always meant to take you when Mr. Norris died. But you must come up and tack on my patterns all the same."
"Yes, I dare say you will; that's natural enough. I suppose you have had as little to vex you since you came into this house as any creature in the world."
"No, my dear; I hope not. I have always found you a very good girl."
"Never, my dear; but you are sure of a comfortable home. It can make very little difference to you, whether you are in one house or the other."
"I think, sister, we need not keep Miss Lee any longer, when Fanny goes to live with you."
"Is she not to live with you? I thought you had settled it with Sir Thomas."
"Indeed, I do not know. I suppose he thought it best."
and I thought so too. We both thought it would be a comfort to you. But if you do not like it, there is no more to be said. She is no encumbrance here."
"Then you will not mind living by yourself quite alone?"
"I hope, sister, things are not so very bad with you neither- considering
"I dare say you will. You always do, don't you?"
"You are very good, but do not trouble yourself about them. They are sure of being well provided for. Sir Thomas will take care of that."
"Oh! that will soon be settled. Sir Thomas has been writing about it, I know."
"Mr. Rushworth,"
"if I were you, I would have a very pretty shrubbery. One likes to get out into a shrubbery in fine weather."
"Yes, indeed, Edmund,"
"I was out above an hour. I sat three-quarters of an hour in the flower-garden, while Fanny cut the roses; and very pleasant it was, I assure you, but very hot. It was shady enough in the alcove, but I declare I quite dreaded the coming home again."
"Yes, and I am afraid they will be the last this year. Poor thing! She found it hot enough; but they were so full-blown that one could not wait."
"She has got it,"
"she has had it ever since she came back from your house the second time."
"I was afraid it would be too much for her,"
"but when the roses were gathered, your aunt wished to have them, and then you know they must be taken home."
"No; but they were to be put into the spare room to dry; and, unluckily, Fanny forgot to lock the door of the room and bring away the key, so she was obliged to go again."
"I am afraid it was, indeed,"
"I am very much afraid she caught the headache there, for the heat was enough to kill anybody. It was as much as I could bear myself. Sitting and calling to Pug, and trying to keep him from the flower-beds, was almost too much for me."
"Oh no! I cannot do without Fanny."
"To be sure not, but I cannot do without her."
"Oh yes! very glad, if your aunt sees no objection."
"What is the matter?"
"I was not asleep."
"Do not act anything improper, my dear,"
"Sir Thomas would not like it.—Fanny, ring the bell; I must have my dinner.—To be sure, Julia is dressed by this time."
"There, my dear, do you hear what Edmund says?"
"One cannot wonder, sister, that Fanny should be delighted: it is all new to her, you know; you and I used to be very fond of a play ourselves, and so am I still; and as soon as I am a little more at leisure, I mean to look in at their rehearsals too. What is the play about, Fanny? you have never told me."
"How do you think the young people have been amusing themselves lately, Sir Thomas? They have been acting. We have been all alive with acting."
"Oh! they'll tell you all about it."
"But why should Mrs. Grant ask Fanny?"
"How came she to think of asking Fanny? Fanny never dines there, you know, in this sort of way. I cannot spare her, and I am sure she does not want to go. Fanny, you do not want to go, do you?"
"I cannot imagine why Mrs. Grant should think of asking her? She never did before. She used to ask your sisters now and then, but she never asked Fanny."
"To be sure, so I shall."
"That's well thought of. So I will, Edmund. I will ask Sir Thomas, as soon as he comes in, whether I can do without her."