Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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"You are fond of the sort of thing?"
"Those who see quickly, will resolve quickly, and act quickly,"
"You can never want employment. Instead of envying Mr. Rushworth, you should assist him with your opinion."
"I was sure she would ride well,"
"she has the make for it. Her figure is as neat as her brother's."
"I must say, ma'am, that Fanny is as little upon the sofa as anybody in the house."
"go boxed up three in a postchaise in this weather, when we may have seats in a barouche! No, my dear Edmund, that will not quite do."
"I am sure she ought to be very much obliged to you,"
"her view of the country was charming, she wished they could all see it,"
"Here is a fine burst of country. I wish you had my seat, but I dare say you will not take it, let me press you ever so much;"
"Do look at Mr. Rushworth and Maria, standing side by side, exactly as if the ceremony were going to be performed. Have not they completely the air of it?"
"Upon my word, it is really a pity that it should not take place directly, if we had but a proper licence, for here we are altogether, and nothing in the world could be more snug and pleasant."
"If Edmund were but in orders!"
"My dear Edmund, if you were but in orders now, you might perform the ceremony directly. How unlucky that you are not ordained; Mr. Rushworth and Maria are quite ready."
"Heyday! Where are the others? I thought Maria and Mr. Crawford were with you."
"A pretty trick, upon my word! I cannot see them anywhere,"
"But they cannot be very far off, and I think I am equal to as much as Maria, even without help."
"Not I, indeed. I have had enough of the family for one morning. Why, child, I have but this moment escaped from his horrible mother. Such a penance as I have been enduring, while you were sitting here so composed and so happy! It might have been as well, perhaps, if you had been in my place, but you always contrive to keep out of these scrapes."
"Yes, yes, we saw him. He was posting away as if upon life and death, and could but just spare time to tell us his errand, and where you all were."
"That is Miss Maria's concern. I am not obliged to punish myself for her sins. The mother I could not avoid, as long as my tiresome aunt was dancing about with the housekeeper, but the son I can get away from."
"Now, Edmund, do not be disagreeable,"
"Nobody loves a play better than you do, or can have gone much farther to see one."
"This is not behaving well by the absent,"
"Here are not women enough. Amelia and Agatha may do for Maria and me, but here is nothing for your sister, Mr. Crawford."
"You do not seem afraid of not keeping your countenance when I come in with a basket of provisions—though one might have supposed— —but it is only as Agatha that I was to be so overpowering!"
"Do not be afraid of my wanting the character,"
"I am not to be Agatha, and I am sure I will do nothing else; and as to Amelia, it is of all parts in the world the most disgusting to me. I quite detest her. An odious, little, pert, unnatural, impudent girl. I have always protested against comedy, and this is comedy in its worst form."
"the Mansfield theatricals would enliven the whole neighbourhood exceedingly,"
"My father is come! He is in the hall at this moment."
"I need not be afraid of appearing before him."