Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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"no, no— not at all —no, thank you";
"William did not like she should come away; he had told her he should miss her very much indeed."
"Yes, he had promised he would, but he had told her to write first."
"she did not know; she had not any paper."
"Yes, very."
"But, cousin, will it go to the post?"
"My uncle!"
"Going to leave you?"
"I shall be very sorry to go away,"
"I hope I am not ungrateful, aunt,"
"And am I never to live here again?"
"something is going to happen which I do not like at all; and though you have often persuaded me into being reconciled to things that I disliked at first, you will not be able to do it now. I am going to live entirely with my aunt Norris."
"Yes; my aunt Bertram has just told me so. It is quite settled. I am to leave Mansfield Park, and go to the White House, I suppose, as soon as she is removed there."
"Oh, cousin!"
"Indeed it does: I cannot like it. I love this house and everything in it: I shall love nothing there. You know how uncomfortable I feel with her."
"I can never be important to any one."
"Everything. My situation, my foolishness and awkwardness."
"You are too kind,"
"how shall I ever thank you as I ought, for thinking so well of me. Oh! cousin, if I am to go away, I shall remember your goodness to the last moment of my life."
"Oh! I do not say so."
"I cannot see things as you do; but I ought to believe you to be right rather than myself, and I am very much obliged to you for trying to reconcile me to what must be. If I could suppose my aunt really to care for me, it would be delightful to feel myself of consequence to anybody. Here, I know, I am of none, and yet I love the place so well."
"Very true. Yes, dear old grey pony! Ah! cousin, when I remember how much I used to dread riding, what terrors it gave me to hear it talked of as likely to do me good (oh! how I have trembled at my uncle's opening his lips if horses were talked of), and then think of the kind pains you took to reason and persuade me out of my fears, and convince me that I should like it after a little while, and feel how right you proved to be, I am inclined to hope you may always prophesy as well."
"Sir Thomas, who had done so much for her and her brothers, and who was gone perhaps never to return! that she should see him go without a tear! it was a shameful insensibility."
"This was so thoughtful and kind!"
"Cut down an avenue! What a pity! Does it not make you think of Cowper? 'Ye fallen avenues, once more I mourn your fate unmerited.'"
"I should like to see Sotherton before it is cut down, to see the place as it is now, in its old state; but I do not suppose I shall."
"Oh! it does not signify. Whenever I do see it, you will tell me how it has been altered."
"It would be delightful to me to see the progress of it all,"
"When they are at a distance from all their family,"
"they can write long letters."
"Very well —very much. I like to hear her talk. She entertains me; and she is so extremely pretty, that I have great pleasure in looking at her."
"Oh yes! she ought not to have spoken of her uncle as she did. I was quite astonished. An uncle with whom she has been living so many years, and who, whatever his faults may be, is so very fond of her brother, treating him, they say, quite like a son. I could not have believed it!"
"And very ungrateful, I think."
"Do not you think,"
"that this impropriety is a reflection itself upon Mrs. Crawford, as her niece has been entirely brought up by her? She cannot have given her right notions of what was due to the Admiral."
"Yes, except as to his writing her such short letters. She made me almost laugh; but I cannot rate so very highly the love or good-nature of a brother who will not give himself the trouble of writing anything worth reading to his sisters, when they are separated. I am sure William would never have used me so, under any circumstances. And what right had she to suppose that you would not write long letters when you were absent?"
"No, I do not know— ot if you want the mare,"
"I shall not ride to-morrow, certainly,"
"I have been out very often lately, and would rather stay at home. You know I am strong enough now to walk very well."
"Since a little before dinner. It is nothing but the heat."
"it was a sort of building which she could not look at but with respect,"
"Now, where is the avenue? The house fronts the east, I perceive. The avenue, therefore, must be at the back of it. Mr. Rushworth talked of the west front."
"I am disappointed,"
"This is not my idea of a chapel. There is nothing awful here, nothing melancholy, nothing grand. Here are no aisles, no arches, no inscriptions, no banners. No banners, cousin, to be 'blown by the night wind of heaven.' No signs that a 'Scottish monarch sleeps below.'"
"It was foolish of me not to think of all that; but I am disappointed."
"It is a pity,"
"that the custom should have been discontinued. It was a valuable part of former times. There is something in a chapel and chaplain so much in character with a great house, with one's ideas of what such a household should be! A whole family assembling regularly for the purpose of prayer is fine!"
"How distressed she will be at what she said just now,"