Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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“How uncomfortable it is,"
“not to have a single acquaintance here!”
“What shall we do? The gentlemen and ladies at this table look as if they wondered why we came here — we seem forcing ourselves into their party.”
“I wish we had any — it would be somebody to go to.”
“Had not we better go away as it is? Here are no tea-things for us, you see.”
“No, indeed, it looks very nice. But, dear Mrs. Allen, are you sure there is nobody you know in all this multitude of people? I think you must know somebody.”
“Very agreeable indeed,”
“You need not give yourself that trouble, sir.”
“About a week, sir,”
Why should you be surprised, sir?”
“Never, sir.”
“Yes, sir, I was there last Monday.”
“Yes, sir, I was at the play on Tuesday.”
“Yes, sir, on Wednesday.”
“Yes — I like it very well.”
“My journal!”
“Indeed I shall say no such thing.”
“If you please.”
“But, perhaps, I keep no journal.”
“I have sometimes thought,”
“whether ladies do write so much better letters than gentlemen! That is — I should not think the superiority was always on our side.”
“And what are they?”
“Upon my word! I need not have been afraid of disclaiming the compliment. You do not think too highly of us in that way.”
“How can you,”
“be so — "
“I was not thinking of anything.”
“Well then, I will not.”
“Have you, indeed! I am very sorry for it; but really I thought I was in very good time. It is but just one. I hope you have not been here long?”
“Yes, I have been reading it ever since I woke; and I am got to the black veil.”
“Oh! Yes, quite; what can it be? But do not tell me — I would not be told upon any account. I know it must be a skeleton, I am sure it is Laurentina’s skeleton. Oh! I am delighted with the book! I should like to spend my whole life in reading it. I assure you, if it had not been to meet you, I would not have come away from it for all the world.”
“Have you, indeed! How glad I am! What are they all?”
“Yes, pretty well; but are they all horrid, are you sure they are all horrid?”
“Scold them! Do you scold them for not admiring her?”
“Oh, dear!”
“How can you say so?”
“But you should not persuade me that I think so very much about Mr. Tilney, for perhaps I may never see him again.”
“No, indeed, I should not. I do not pretend to say that I was not very much pleased with him; but while I have Udolpho to read, I feel as if nobody could make me miserable. Oh! The dreadful black veil! My dear Isabella, I am sure there must be Laurentina’s skeleton behind it.”
“No, she does not. She very often reads Sir Charles Grandison herself; but new books do not fall in our way.”
“It is not like Udolpho at all; but yet I think it is very entertaining.”
“But it does not signify if they do,”
“Are they? Well, I never observed that. They always behave very well to me.”
“I hardly know. I never much thought about it. Something between both, I think. Brown — not fair, and — and not very dark.”
“Betray you! What do you mean?”
“They went towards the church-yard.”
“perhaps we may overtake the two young men.”
“But if we only wait a few minutes, there will be no danger of our seeing them at all.”
“Good heaven! 'Tis James!”
“I do not know the distance.”
“He does look very hot, to be sure.”