Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status


mode of speech

speaker name

“You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it.”
“What is his name?”
“Is he married or single?”
“How so? How can it affect them?”
“Is that his design in settling here?”
“I see no occasion for that. You and the girls may go, or you may send them by themselves, which perhaps will be still better, for as you are as handsome as any of them, Mr. Bingley may like you the best of the party.”
“In such cases, a woman has not often much beauty to think of.”
“It is more than I engage for, I assure you.”
“You are over scrupulous surely. I dare say Mr. Bingley will be very glad to see you; and I will send a few lines by you to assure him of my hearty consent to his marrying whichever he chooses of the girls; though I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy.”
“They have none of them much to recommend them,”
“they are all silly and ignorant like other girls; but Lizzy has something more of quickness than her sisters.”
“You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least.”
“But I hope you will get over it, and live to see many young men of four thousand a year come into the neighbourhood.”
“Depend upon it, my dear, that when there are twenty, I will visit them all.”
he should not go;
“I hope Mr. Bingley will like it, Lizzy.”
“No more have I,”
“and I am glad to find that you do not depend on her serving you.”
“Kitty has no discretion in her coughs,”
“she times them ill.”
“When is your next ball to be, Lizzy?”
“Then, my dear, you may have the advantage of your friend, and introduce Mr. Bingley to her.”
“I honour your circumspection. A fortnight's acquaintance is certainly very little. One cannot know what a man really is by the end of a fortnight. But if we do not venture somebody else will; and after all, Mrs. Long and her daughters must stand their chance; and, therefore, as she will think it an act of kindness, if you decline the office, I will take it on myself.”
“What can be the meaning of that emphatic exclamation?”
“Do you consider the forms of introduction, and the stress that is laid on them, as nonsense? I cannot quite agree with you there. What say you, Mary? For you are a young lady of deep reflection, I know, and read great books and make extracts.”
“While Mary is adjusting her ideas,”
“let us return to Mr. Bingley.”
“I am sorry to hear that; but why did not you tell me that before? If I had known as much this morning, I certainly would not have called on him. It is very unlucky; but as I have actually paid the visit, we cannot escape the acquaintance now.”
“Now, Kitty, you may cough as much as you choose,”
“Come, Darcy,”
“I must have you dance. I hate to see you standing about by yourself in this stupid manner. You had much better dance.”
“I certainly shall not. You know how I detest it, unless I am particularly acquainted with my partner. At such an assembly as this it would be insupportable. Your sisters are engaged, and there is not another woman in the room whom it would not be a punishment to me to stand up with.”
“I would not be so fastidious as you are,”
“for a kingdom! Upon my honour, I never met with so many pleasant girls in my life as I have this evening; and there are several of them you see uncommonly pretty.”
“You are dancing with the only handsome girl in the room,”
“Oh! She is the most beautiful creature I ever beheld! But there is one of her sisters sitting down just behind you, who is very pretty, and I dare say very agreeable. Do let me ask my partner to introduce you.”
“Which do you mean?”
“She is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me; and I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men. You had better return to your partner and enjoy her smiles, for you are wasting your mite with me.”
his wife's views on the stranger would be disappointed;
“If he had had any compassion for me,”
“he would not have danced half so much! For God's sake, say no more of his partners. O that he had sprained his ankle in the first dance!”
had never met with more pleasant people or prettier girls in his life; everybody had been most kind and attentive to him; there had been no formality, no stiffness; he had soon felt acquainted with all the room; and, as to Miss Bennet, he could not conceive an angel more beautiful.
had seen a collection of people in whom there was little beauty and no fashion, for none of whom he had felt the smallest interest, and from none received either attention or pleasure.
Miss Bennet
pretty, but she smiled too much.
“If I were as rich as Mr. Darcy,”
“I should not care how proud I was. I would keep a pack of foxhounds, and drink a bottle of wine a day.”
she should not;
she hardly had a good feature in her face,