Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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"The tree thrives well, beyond a doubt, madam,"
"The soil is good; and I never pass it without regretting that the fruit should be so little worth the trouble of gathering."
"You were imposed on, ma'am,"
"these potatoes have as much the flavour of a Moor Park apricot as the fruit from that tree. It is an insipid fruit at the best; but a good apricot is eatable, which none from my garden are."
"Very well, very well,"
"all the better; I am glad to hear you have anything so good in the house. But Miss Price and Mr. Edmund Bertram, I dare say, would take their chance. We none of us want to hear the bill of fare. A friendly meeting, and not a fine dinner, is all we have in view. A turkey, or a goose, or a leg of mutton, or whatever you and your cook chuse to give us."