Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status

class status


mode of speech

had never met with more pleasant people or prettier girls in his life; everybody had been most kind and attentive to him; there had been no formality, no stiffness; he had soon felt acquainted with all the room; and, as to Miss Bennet, he could not conceive an angel more beautiful.
to fetch her others — all that his library afforded.
Mr. Jones's being sent for immediately;
every possible attention might be paid to the sick lady and her sister.
it would not be safe for her —
she was not enough recovered;
on his way to Longbourn on purpose to inquire after her.
for taking the earliest opportunity of waiting on her, after his return from London, whither he was obliged to go the next day for a short time.
whether all her sisters were at Longbourn.
great pleasure in the certainty of seeing Elizabeth again, having still a great deal to say to her, and many inquiries to make after all their Hertfordshire friends.
he did,
A few weeks,
as handsome as she had been last year; as good natured, and as unaffected, though not quite so chatty.
something of his concern
at having been prevented by business.
engaged elsewhere.
He should be particularly happy at any time, etc. etc.; and if she would give him leave, would take an early opportunity of waiting on them.
Yes, he had no engagement at all for to-morrow;
the good wishes and affection of a sister.
to avoid the confinement of such an intrusion, and walk away with him into the shrubbery.
giving them a hint to be gone.