Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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marriage status

mode of speech

Fanny had got another child.
she could not get her poor sister and her family out of her head,
much as they had all done for her, she seemed to be wanting to do more;
poor Mrs. Price should be relieved from the charge and expense of one child entirely out of her great number.
it would be totally out of Mrs. Norris's power to take any share in the personal charge of her.
Mrs. Norris was sorry to say that
the little girl's staying with them, at least as things then were, was quite out of the question. Poor Mr. Norris's indifferent state of health made it an impossibility: he could no more bear the noise of a child than he could fly; if, indeed, he should ever get well of his gouty complaints, it would be a different matter: she should then be glad to take her turn, and think nothing of the inconvenience; but just now, poor Mr. Norris took up every moment of her time, and the very mention of such a thing she was sure would distract him.
its being a most difficult thing, encouraged him to hope that between them it would be easily managed.
her wonderful good fortune, and the extraordinary degree of gratitude and good behaviour which it ought to produce
some steady old thing might be found among the numbers belonging to the Park that would do vastly well; or
one might be borrowed of the steward; or
perhaps Dr. Grant might now and then lend them the pony he sent to the post.
absolutely unnecessary, and even improper, that Fanny should have a regular lady's horse of her own, in the style of her cousins.
She was sure Sir Thomas had never intended it: and she must say that, to be making such a purchase in his absence, and adding to the great expenses of his stable, at a time when a large part of his income was unsettled, seemed to her very unjustifiable.
Maria was indeed the pride and delight of them all— perfectly faultless —an angel; and, of course, so surrounded by admirers, must be difficult in her choice: but yet, as far as Mrs. Norris could allow herself to decide on so short an acquaintance, Mr. Rushworth appeared precisely the young man to deserve and attach her.
their having positively assured Mrs. Rushworth that Fanny could not go, and the very strange appearance there would consequently be in taking her,
It must have the strangest appearance!
It would be something so very unceremonious, so bordering on disrespect for Mrs. Rushworth, whose own manners were such a pattern of good-breeding and attention, that she really did not feel equal to it.
thought it an excellent plan, and had it at her tongue's end, and was on the point of proposing it, when Mrs. Grant spoke.
his falling in love with Julia had come to nothing;
but with so many to care for, how was it possible for even her activity to keep pace with her wishes?
for she had made the match; she had done everything;
its being impossible among so many dishes but that some must be cold.
A ball at such a time! His daughters absent and herself not consulted!
She must be the doer of everything: Lady Bertram would of course be spared all thought and exertion, and it would all fall upon her. She should have to do the honours of the evening;
as to the rooms he would think fittest to be used,
having been on the point of proposing the 22nd herself, as by far the best day for the purpose.
It was an injury and affront to Julia, who ought to have been Mr. Crawford's choice;
Fanny could be very well spared— she being ready to give up all her own time to her as requested— and, in short, could not really be wanted or missed.
there being room for a third in the carriage,
to go and see her poor dear sister Price.
She must say that she had more than half a mind to go with the young people; it would be such an indulgence to her; she had not seen her poor dear sister Price for more than twenty years; and it would be a help to the young people in their journey to have her older head to manage for them; and she could not help thinking her poor dear sister Price would feel it very unkind of her not to come by such an opportunity.
she could not possibly be spared from Mansfield Park at present;
she was a great deal too necessary to Sir Thomas and Lady Bertram for her to be able to answer it to herself to leave them even for a week, and therefore must certainly sacrifice every other pleasure to that of being useful to them.
her poor dear sister Price
One was found to have too small a print for a child's eyes, and the other to be too cumbersome for her to carry about.
the match had been her own contriving,
Her companions were relieved, but there was no good for her.
Had Fanny accepted Mr. Crawford this could not have happened.
her as a spy, and an intruder, and an indigent niece,