Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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he was,
“But we expect him to-morrow, with a large party of friends.”
it was a picture of a young gentleman, the son of her late master's steward, who had been brought up by him at his own expense.
“He is now gone into the army,”
“but I am afraid he has turned out very wild.”
“And that,”
“is my master — and very like him. It was drawn at the same time as the other — about eight years ago.”
“Does that young lady know Mr. Darcy?”
“And do not you think him a very handsome gentleman, ma'am?”
“I am sure I know none so handsome; but in the gallery upstairs you will see a finer, larger picture of him than this. This room was my late master's favourite room, and these miniatures are just as they used to be then. He was very fond of them.”
“Oh! yes — the handsomest young lady that ever was seen; and so accomplished! — She plays and sings all day long. In the next room is a new instrument just come down for her — a present from my master; she comes here to-morrow with him.”
“Not so much as I could wish, sir; but I dare say he may spend half his time here; and Miss Darcy is always down for the summer months.”
“Yes, sir; but I do not know when that will be. I do not know who is good enough for him.”
“I say no more than the truth, and everybody will say that knows him,”
“I have never known a cross word from him in my life, and I have known him ever since he was four years old.”
“Yes, sir, I know I am. If I were to go through the world, I could not meet with a better. But I have always observed, that they who are good-natured when children, are good-natured when they grow up; and he was always the sweetest-tempered, most generous-hearted boy in the world.”
"Yes, ma'am, that he was indeed; and his son will be just like him — just as affable to the poor.”
“He is the best landlord, and the best master,”
“that ever lived; not like the wild young men nowadays, who think of nothing but themselves. There is not one of his tenants or servants but what will give him a good name. Some people call him proud; but I am sure I never saw anything of it. To my fancy, it is only because he does not rattle away like other young men.”
it was but just done to give pleasure to Miss Darcy, who had taken a liking to the room when last at Pemberley.
Miss Darcy's delight, when she should enter the room.
“And this is always the way with him,”
“Whatever can give his sister any pleasure is sure to be done in a moment. There is nothing he would not do for her.”
it had been taken in his father's lifetime.
“I beg your pardon, madam, for interrupting you, but I was in hopes you might have got some good news from town, so I took the liberty of coming to ask.”
“Dear madam,”
“don't you know there is an express come for master from Mr. Gardiner? He has been here this half-hour, and master has had a letter.”
“If you are looking for my master, ma'am, he is walking towards the little copse.”
her joy.
Captain Wentworth very much in the way.
She had too old a regard for him to be so wholly estranged as might in two meetings extinguish every past hope, and leave him nothing to do but to keep away from Uppercross:
when such a man as Captain Wentworth was to be regarded as the probable cause. He had been absent only two Sundays, and when they parted, had left her interested, even to the height of his wishes, in his prospect of soon quitting his present curacy, and obtaining that of Uppercross instead. It had then seemed the object nearest her heart, that Dr Shirley, the rector,
should be quite fixed on engaging a curate; should make his curacy quite as good as he could afford, and should give Charles Hayter the promise of it. The advantage of his having to come only to Uppercross, instead of going six miles another way; of his having, in every respect, a better curacy; of his belonging to their dear Dr Shirley, and of dear, good Dr Shirley's being relieved from the duty which he could no longer get through without most injurious fatigue,
The intervals of sense and consciousness were believed to be stronger.
There had been a time,
when her spirits had nearly failed. She could not call herself an invalid now, compared with her state on first reaching Bath. Then she had, indeed, been a pitiable object; for she had caught cold on the journey, and had hardly taken possession of her lodgings before she was again confined to her bed and suffering under severe and constant pain; and all this among strangers, with the absolute necessity of having a regular nurse, and finances at that moment particularly unfit to meet any extraordinary expense. She had weathered it, however, and could truly say that it had done her good. It had increased her comforts by making her feel herself to be in good hands. She had seen too much of the world, to expect sudden or disinterested attachment anywhere, but her illness had proved to her that her landlady had a character to preserve, and would not use her ill; and she had been particularly fortunate in her nurse, as a sister of her landlady, a nurse by profession, and who had always a home in that house when unemployed, chanced to be at liberty just in time to attend her.