Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels


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Sir William had been delighted with him. He was quite young, wonderfully handsome, extremely agreeable, and to crown the whole, he meant to be at the next assembly with a large party.
his being gone to London only to get a large party for the ball;
“Come, Darcy,”
“I must have you dance. I hate to see you standing about by yourself in this stupid manner. You had much better dance.”
“I would not be so fastidious as you are,”
“for a kingdom! Upon my honour, I never met with so many pleasant girls in my life as I have this evening; and there are several of them you see uncommonly pretty.”
“Oh! She is the most beautiful creature I ever beheld! But there is one of her sisters sitting down just behind you, who is very pretty, and I dare say very agreeable. Do let me ask my partner to introduce you.”
had never met with more pleasant people or prettier girls in his life; everybody had been most kind and attentive to him; there had been no formality, no stiffness; he had soon felt acquainted with all the room; and, as to Miss Bennet, he could not conceive an angel more beautiful.
“Yes; but he seemed to like his second better.”
“My overhearings were more to the purpose than yours, Eliza,”
“Mr. Darcy is not so well worth listening to as his friend, is he? — Poor Eliza! — to be only just tolerable.”
“I do not mind his not talking to Mrs. Long,”
“but I wish he had danced with Eliza.”
“His pride,”
“does not offend me so much as pride often does, because there is an excuse for it. One cannot wonder that so very fine a young man, with family, fortune, everything in his favour, should think highly of himself. If I may so express it, he has a right to be proud.”
“If I were as rich as Mr. Darcy,”
“I should not care how proud I was. I would keep a pack of foxhounds, and drink a bottle of wine a day.”
she should not;
“It may perhaps be pleasant,”
“to be able to impose on the public in such a case; but it is sometimes a disadvantage to be so very guarded. If a woman conceals her affection with the same skill from the object of it, she may lose the opportunity of fixing him; and it will then be but poor consolation to believe the world equally in the dark. There is so much of gratitude or vanity in almost every attachment, that it is not safe to leave any to itself. We can all begin freely — a slight preference is natural enough; but there are very few of us who have heart enough to be really in love without encouragement. In nine cases out of ten a woman had better show more affection than she feels. Bingley likes your sister undoubtedly; but he may never do more than like her, if she does not help him on.”
“Remember, Eliza, that he does not know Jane's disposition as you do.”
“Perhaps he must, if he sees enough of her. But, though Bingley and Jane meet tolerably often, it is never for many hours together; and, as they always see each other in large mixed parties, it is impossible that every moment should be employed in conversing together. Jane should therefore make the most of every half-hour in which she can command his attention. When she is secure of him, there will be more leisure for falling in love as much as she chooses.”
“Not as you represent it. Had she merely dined with him, she might only have discovered whether he had a good appetite; but you must remember that four evenings have also been spent together — and four evenings may do a great deal.”
“I wish Jane success with all my heart; and if she were married to him to-morrow, I should think she had as good a chance of happiness as if she were to be studying his character for a twelvemonth. Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least. They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life.”
“That is a question which Mr. Darcy only can answer.”
such a subject to him;
“It will be her turn soon to be teased,”
“I am going to open the instrument, Eliza, and you know what follows.”
“What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all. I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”
“Your friend performs delightfully,”
” and I doubt not that you are an adept in the science yourself, Mr. Darcy.”
“Yes, indeed, and received no inconsiderable pleasure from the sight. Do you often dance at St. James's?”
“Do you not think it would be a proper compliment to the place?”
“You have a house in town, I conclude?”
“I had once had some thought of fixing in town myself — for I am fond of superior society; but I did not feel quite certain that the air of London would agree with Lady Lucas.”
“My dear Miss Eliza, why are you not dancing?— Mr. Darcy, you must allow me to present this young lady to you as a very desirable partner. — You cannot refuse to dance, I am sure when so much beauty is before you.”
“You excel so much in the dance, Miss Eliza, that it is cruel to deny me the happiness of seeing you; and though this gentleman dislikes the amusement in general, he can have no objection, I am sure, to oblige us for one half-hour.”
“He is, indeed; but considering the inducement, my dear Miss Eliza, we cannot wonder at his complaisance — for who would object to such a partner?”
“I can guess the subject of your reverie.”
“You are considering how insupportable it would be to pass many evenings in this manner — in such society; and indeed I am quite of your opinion. I was never more annoyed! The insipidity, and yet the noise — the nothingness, and yet the self-importance of all those people!— What would I give to hear your strictures on them!”
he would tell her what lady had the credit of inspiring such reflections.
“Miss Elizabeth Bennet!”
“I am all astonishment. How long has she been such a favourite? — and pray, when am I to wish you joy?”
“Nay, if you are so serious about it, I shall consider the matter is absolutely settled. You will be having a charming mother-in-law, indeed; and, of course, she will always be at Pemberley with you.”
“My dear Friend—
“If you are not so compassionate as to dine to-day with Louisa and me, we shall be in danger of hating each other for the rest of our lives, for a whole day's tȇte-à-tȇte between two women can never end without a quarrel. Come as soon as you can on the receipt of this. My brother and the gentlemen are to dine with the officers. — Yours ever,
“Caroline Bingley.”
“to send for the horses?”
“We will go as far as Meryton with you,”