Austen Said:

Patterns of Diction in Jane Austen's Major Novels

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"Ha! welcome back, my boy. Glad to see you. Have you heard the news? The Thrush went out of harbour this morning. Sharp is the word, you see! By Gā€”, you are just in time! The doctor has been here inquiring for you: he has got one of the boats, and is to be off for Spithead by six, so you had better go with him. I have been to Turner's about your mess; it is all in a way to be done. I should not wonder if you had your orders to-morrow: but you cannot sail with this wind, if you are to cruise to the westward; and
Captain Walsh thinks
By Gā€”, I wish you may! But old
Well, well, we are ready, whatever happens. But by Gā€”, you lost a fine sight by not being here in the morning to see the Thrush go out of harbour! I would not have been out of the way for a thousand pounds. Old
Scholey
ran in at breakfast-time,
to say
I jumped up, and made but two steps to the platform. If ever there was a perfect beauty afloat, she is one; and there she lays at Spithead, and anybody in England would take her for an eight-and-twenty. I was upon the platform two hours this afternoon looking at her. She lays close to the Endymion, between her and the Cleopatra, just to the eastward of the sheer hulk."
"Devil take those young dogs! How they are singing out! Ay, Sam's voice louder than all the rest! That boy is fit for a boatswain. Holla, you there! Sam, stop your confounded pipe, or I shall be after you."
"Come, girls; come, Fan; come, Sue, take care of yourselves; keep a sharp lookout!"
"What's the name of your great cousins in town, Fan?"
"And don't they live in Wimpole Street?"
"Then, there's the devil to pay among them, that's all! There"
"much good may such fine relations do you. I don't know what Sir Thomas may think of such matters; he may be too much of the courtier and fine gentleman to like his daughter the less. But, by Gā€”! if she belonged to me, I'd give her the rope's end as long as I could stand over her. A little flogging for man and woman too would be the best way of preventing such things."
"It might be all a lie,"
"but so many fine ladies were going to the devil nowadays that way, that there was no answering for anybody."